Cabinet Fever

My kitchen is small, originally with golden oak cabinets in one corner. When I first moved in, I got the painter to paint the lowers dark grey and the uppers lighter grey, both darker than the walls (all of which I know now I could have done myself). But… my kitchen looked junky and I knew I needed more storage space:

Pieces I had brought or was given.
Yes, I shall paint the backsplash at some point.

I looked at adding cabinets, shelves or other small kitchen alternatives. I hunted from Ikea to the ReStore. After finding Upcycler’s Anonymous, a Facebook group of 60k+ people from all over the world and seeing the gorgeous work they do, I decided on a china cabinet. I then watched Facebook marketplace for just the right one. Before long, a faux Mission Style cabinet popped up for $175.00 just the next town over. If I knew then what I know now, I would have waited, because china cabinets are often given away free; I’ve seen some nice ones, too. I recruited my nephews, rented a truck and off we went amid ice and snow in March to pick this badboy up.

Then it sat in my garage in two pieces, side-by-side, until July, completely blocking everything. “Why did it sit so long?” you ask. Sure you did. Because this newbie needed to be good enough at upcycling to tackle an important (to me) piece. So I practiced on some side tables and benches (see previous posts), and eventually decided I was ready.

I bought two wheeled hand carts, so I needed no help to wheel the pieces out of the garage and onto the driveway. I tackled the base first. I removed the drawers, doors, shelves and hardware. I sanded, prepped, painted the inside white with primer, and the outside with black Fusion Mineral Paint. I had the neighbour help me move it indoors, where I re-installed the drawers and doors and shelves. The best part was that the cupboard doors in the base were comprised of square “bars” over a back that just pulled out, having been held in with tiny staples.

By painting the backing white and the “bars” black, I achieved a perfect black and white striped look that goes perfectly with my decor.

I then painted to upper piece, first removing the glass sides and the back. The back was mirrored, which, once it was filled with contents, would just look so busy, so I removed the mirrors. The wood underneath wasn’t great quality, but 2 coats of primer plus 3 coats of Fusion Champlain, and it was acceptable.

At this point, I bought a spray gun, and the painting sped up. It took 2 more trips to get it together–one to lug the frame into the house, where I re-attached the back while it sat in the front hall, and then again lifting it onto the base. At that point, I re-attached the glass sides and the door hardware and lastly, installed the glass shelves.

It fit along the wall opposite the cabinets as if made for it, and as both the sides and the front cabinet doors are glass, it doesn’t block the light from the passthrough.

I couldn’t be more pleased. Now I have, as my mother used to say, “A place for everything and everything in its place.”

The finished product. I like the hardware even though the cabinent no longer looks Mission Style.

And of course, because I had googled “Black China Cabinets,” Facebook keeps sticking this in my feed:

$7,690, Facebook? Srsly? Have you met me? And that’s American $s, before taxes and shipping. I don’t happen to have a spare $10,000 on me. I like mine better. I figure, by the time I was done, I’d spent:

$175 Cdn, for the cabinet, no taxes

$100 truck rental,

$30 wine for nephews

$50 in paint (probably less because I’d bought a box of misc. Fusion paint and accessories from a women moving into a condo for $50 and it included both almost full jars of Coal Black and of Champlain.)

So, let’s call it $350. Versus $10,000. Anyone wondering why we upcycle?

Now, on to the final piece of furniture I need to complete my home. Bet you can’t wait to see what I do with an antique dresser!

About Gina Storm Grant

I'm a writer and now, a newbie upcycler. I have 12 books published under 2 pen names. I've taken a 2-year hiatus from writing while I re-purposed my life, but the more I rescue furniture destined to become landfill, the more I feel inspired to write a new book. After all, I gotta do something while waiting for the next coat of paint to dry. Stick with me while I figure out the differences between chalk, milk and mineral paints, which stripper removes shellac and sticky stuff, and whether I want to do stencils, tansfers or decoupage. Oh, and which one is the drill and which the power screwdriver.

Posted on August 17, 2019, in #NewLife, #Upcycling, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

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