It’s always the author’s fault

I picked up a book from the library yesterday and began to read it last night. Yikes! Is the type small. It’s like the anti-large-print book. I’m lucky. By taking off my glasses, I can read it just fine, but most people can’t.

The book was printed back in 1987. So every single copy sold was hard copy. Someone walked into a bookstore (this predates Amazon by 7 years), looked at the type and put it back on the shelf.

The publisher had a choice to produce a larger book, but chose to save on paper and ink. Then when it didn’t sell, I’m sure they blamed the author.

Why does publishing continually shoot itself in the foot and then say we’re the problem?

Here’s a shot of a recent Stephanie Plum mystery which I’d just finished re-reading next to “Double Whammy” by Carl Hiaasen:

small type

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Luckily, he went on to be a popular bestseller. But it’s one more thing for us authors to watch out for if we get a print deal.

Don’t get me wrong, I *want* a publishing contract with a print deal, I just want to be wary of the things that could go awry.

About Gina Storm Grant

I'm a writer and now, a newbie upcycler. I have 12 books published under 2 pen names. I've taken a 2-year hiatus from writing while I re-purposed my life, but the more I rescue furniture destined to become landfill, the more I feel inspired to write a new book. After all, I gotta do something while waiting for the next coat of paint to dry. Stick with me while I figure out the differences between chalk, milk and mineral paints, which stripper removes shellac and sticky stuff, and whether I want to do stencils, tansfers or decoupage. Oh, and which one is the drill and which the power screwdriver.

Posted on December 14, 2015, in Opinion, Publishing, Writing and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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